Jean-Charles de Quillacq

1979, France ; lives and works in Zurich


It might be said of Jean-Charles de Quillacq that what he erects and undertakes sometimes barely stands up. His works have a special relation with the body with regard to its powerlessness and dependence, but also to what it can produce in terms of resemblances and duplications. In this respect, Les Petites Filles (2015) compares three photographs depicting the artist, his sister and his niece wearing diving masks which prevent us from telling them apart. Close by, several sculptures respond. Among them, Horizontal Thoughts (2015) is made up of two casts of the artist’s left leg, set side by side in their sneakers, suggesting the discomfort of an immobilized gait. Mes béchamel (2018) consists for its part in the assemblage on the floor of several tubes made of epoxy, a resin dear to the artist who tirelessly works it like a form of “psychic matter”. Put side by side, these tubular elements imitate the garden hose acting as their support. Blue Jean (2015) is a sculpture composed of three resin casts of the artist’s partner’s leg, onto which he has blown the blue ink of Bic biros. His exacting work carried out by his mouth underscores the importance of the performative aspect and oral nature of J.-C. de Quillacq’s work, giving rise, here, to the production of new works.
For Le Remplaçant (2018), he will welcome visitors to the Frac Bretagne with a proposal involving relations of consent and commercial transactions. In exchange for letting their nose be cast, he will receive them individually for several minutes in the enclosed room, wearing the mask of his own face. Each visitor will then be free to ask him anything they want. As the exchanges are gradually wound up, the nose castings find their way to La Place des Rechanges (2018), a rolled-up blanket which they seem to protrude from, like sleeping faces in a bed. If you do not cross paths with J.-C. de Quillacq at the Frac Bretagne, you will perhaps have a chance to get a glimpse of him in the Musée des beaux-arts collections. Because, out of either empathy, emotion or imitation, he regularly responds to the painted materiality of the tears of the Marie-Madeleine Pénitente (1657) of Philippe de Champaigne (L’Imitation par les larmes, 2018).

Avec le soutien de / with the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture 

Blue-jean, 2015

Frac Bretagne

Blue BIC ink blown on acrylic resin

Collection Frac Limousin, Limoges.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.


Horizontal Thoughts, 2015

Frac Bretagne

Acrylic resin, sneakers

Courtesy Marcelle Alix, Paris.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.


La place des rechanges, 2018

Frac Bretagne

Blanket, plaster casts

Courtesy of the artist.
Production Les Ateliers de Rennes – 2018.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.


Les petites filles, 2015

Frac Bretagne

C prints under Diasec

Courtesy Marcelle Alix, Paris.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.


L’imitation par les larmes, 2018

Musée des beaux-arts de Rennes

Performance

Courtesy of the artist.
Production Les Ateliers de Rennes – 2018.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.


Mes béchamel, 2018

Frac Bretagne

Garden hose, epoxy

Courtesy of the artist.
Production Les Ateliers de Rennes – 2018.
With the support of Pro Helvetia, Fondation suisse pour la culture.